Behind the Republican Revolt

Opposition to the President's war policies is growing among members of his own party in Congress. Unlike Bush, they have to run again in '08

Jay L. Clendenin / Polaris for TIME

Senator Chuck Hagel (R-NE) in the U.S. Capitol, January 16, 2007

As George Bush takes the lectern in the House chamber for his State of the Union address, he can finally claim that he is fulfilling the promise of his 2000 presidential campaign to be a uniter and not a divider. With his proposal to increase the number of U.S. troops in Iraq, Bush is indeed bringing Democrats and Republicans together. The problem for him is that the bipartisan front they are forming is against him. It has the potential to lead to the most serious foreign policy confrontation between a President and Congress since the Vietnam War.

Though Democrats are now...

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