The Enron Effect

The bosses take the fall for a criminal corporate flameout. What has changed, and why it will never, ever, ever happen again. Maybe

Enron's stock price was up 36% last week, despite the news that founder Ken Lay and former CEO Jeff Skilling had been convicted of lying to investors and employees as the company sank into bankruptcy in 2001. Can't find this heady little stock on the N.Y.S.E.? Try looking on the "pink sheets," where Enron is now a penny stock listed as ECSPQ.PK. The once mighty energy firm, which traded at $90 a share six years ago, is selling for 15¢, up 4¢ on the day after the verdicts. It would be laughable if so many people hadn't lost so much--stockholders lost $60...

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