Utah's Toxic Opportunity

SOME GOSHUTE INDIANS WANT TO CREATE A NUCLEAR-FUEL DUMP ON THEIR LAND. CONTROVERSIAL? OF COURSE

An hour south of the Great Salt Lake, a two-lane blacktop crosses a cattle guard into a wild expanse of golden scrub grass. A few trailers and prefab houses, a collection of junked cars and a gas station that sells Spam and soda pop--such is the homeland of the Native American tribe known as the Skull Valley Band of Goshutes. At their peak, the Goshutes numbered 20,000. Today only a dozen of the band's 121 members live on the 18,000-acre reservation; the rest have scattered across the West in search of a better life.

The land they left behind is scarred...

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