Second Opinion: Should Ex-Smokers Quit the Patch?

Researchers have long assumed that it was tobacco's tar and carcinogenic chemicals that were primarily to blame for many lung cancers. But a new study suggests that nicotine also plays a critical role in promoting lung cancer and increasing its risk. If so, what does that mean for ex-smokers who rely on nicotine patches, gums and sprays? "Smokers who can quit should quit," says Dr. Phillip Dennis, lead author of the recent study in the Journal of Clinical Investigation. "If you need a supplement, don't do it without medical supervision." Nicotine itself may not be a cancer-causing agent, but, according to...

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